Leadership Mints Series Sampler On Penalizing Bad Behavior

You’re running a daycare center. Your staff is already working a 12-hour day.

At 6 p.m. they are looking forward to calling it a day. However a few parents still have not picked up their children by the close of business.

Your staff is getting is frustrated. And no wonder.

The problem of late pickups has been festering for a long time.

The owner of the daycare center has the solution. “We will start fining parents for pick ups that are 15 minutes late on an escalating scale. Maybe that will change their behavior.”

But the fines failed to change the parent’s late pickups. Why?

The situation needed more leadership and less management.

Childcare is no ordinary pay-for-services rendered business model.

Customers (parents) chose a daycare facility for much more than as a baby-sitting service. The customers (parents) commissioned the daycare center as stand-in parents for their children, stewards of their children’s lives and well-being.

They sought virtual missionaries — not mercenaries — to protect  Continue reading “Leadership Mints Series Sampler On Penalizing Bad Behavior”

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Leadership Mints Series Sampler Aligning Personal Harmony

What if you could feel good doing the work you love (virtually without breaking a sweat). What if you you feel so relaxed and in tune with yourself as you work that your heart rate says you must have fallen asleep?

No way you say? Not in your stress-filled, work-a-day world.

Yet the most effective leaders align their personal harmony. They define it, refine  it, engage it and leverage it — over time–and work more productively.

With less stress.

Consider the experience of David Brooks, the author of The Second Mountain.

He recalls the first time he wore a Fitbit — a wrist-watch like device that monitors a variety of the body’s functions.

Brooks was surprised that his Fitbit recorded that he was falling asleep every day between 8 am and 11 am.

But he wasn’t asleep. He was writing. He was doing what he loved.

He was “thinking on paper” as author William Zinssner defined the writing process in his book On Writing Well.

“Apparently writing is the time when my heartbeat is truly at rest, when I feel right with myself,” Brooks observed.

As every decision maker knows when you feel right with yourself, your concentration level increases and your creative output soars.

You get more done with seemingly less effort.

To learn how to more fully align your skills and talents to feel even more right with yourself and get even more done  purchase a 300-page book now available on Amazon. com filled with 77 short stories (5-minute reads called Leadership Mints) on examples from business, sports and politics.

It’s titled:          LOVING Like a Leader with Empathy– one of three books in The Leadership Mints Series designed to help leaders refresh their feeling for leading. And as a bonus, the postscript titled– BUSINESS: A HUMAN EXPERIENCE — shares the impetus for this book on empathy impacting the bottom line.

The two other books in The Leadership Mints Series -now available on Amazon.com — include THINKING Like a Leader with Clarity and SPEAKING Like a Leader with Civility

 

 

 

 

All three books in The Leadership Mints Series are designed for busy leaders seeking to refresh their feeling for leading in 5-minutes or less — the average reading of a Leadership Mint.

           What ‘s a Leadership Mint?

Consumed like a breath mint — quick and on-the-go — a Leadership Mint is a short story that energizes leadership behaviors and personalizes leadership principles so they are more easily remembered, more readily acted upon and more fully applied.

 

Leadership Mints Series Sampler On Wheeling & Dealing

Whew! How do we cope with this newly invited elephant in the room?

That’s what Chief Executive Officers must be feeling today after a group of more than 180 leading chief executive officers of large corporations  broadened the scope, significance and purpose of a corporation.

Now more hands than ever before could be in the proverbial cookie jar at the same time.

No longer can CEOs focus solely on “Maxmizing Profits”  –the prevailing purpose of a corporation for nearly 50 years — that has governed CEO decision making.

Now in making business decisions CEOs have to keep all other stakeholders — from employees to customers to suppliers etc. in mind –as well as stockholders and the communities they serve.

Yes, indeed, conflicting priorities just got supersized. Big time!

That’s the immediate impact of  the historic statement the Business Roundtable issued on August 19, 2019 that will no doubt change the way business is taught in colleges and the way business is conducted on Main Street and Wall Street in the future.

But how do you factor in additional priorities when already  64% of 1,800 executives in a Booz & Company survey cited “too many conflicting priorities” as their biggest frustration factor BEFORE the Business Roundtable’s decision.

How do you balance the needs of all those various stakeholders –including stockholders — pushing and tugging on your bottom line?

Spokes Tightnened

Imagine thinking of your company or organization as if it were a bicycle. Chances are you will initially  be attracted to how many gears you can employee or the efficiency in the grip of the handle bars and  pedals on your speed.

But the effective CEO knows  that without alignment your bicycle of a corporation will wobble off course.

That’s why the most astute CEOs wheel and deal.

They  consider each of  28 spokes around the rim of his or her “bicycle wheel” as if they each represented a different constituent, a different stakeholder, a different public.

Pull too much on the spoke for investors and their demands for increased dividends and you loosen the spoke for employees and their demands for less costly health care.

Then your rim –like any organization pulled and tugged in contradictory directions—surrenders its balance. And you are out of control.

So how do you maintain that balance and help your company stay true to its mission and continued growth and profitability despite so many conflicting priorities?

The most effective leaders serve the needs of one group without compromising on the need of other groups. If one is tighten one spoke then another reciprocating spoke must be loosened. Balance is the key to an even more profitable balance sheet in the future.

To learn more about balancing the needs of various stakeholders, purchase a 300-page book now available on Amazon. com filled with 77 short stories (5-minute reads called Leadership Mints) on examples from business, sports and politics.

It’s titled:          LOVING Like a Leader with Empathy– one of three books in The Leadership Mints Series designed to help leaders refresh their feeling for leading. And as a bonus, the postscript titled– BUSINESS: A HUMAN EXPERIENCE — shares the impetus for this book on empathy impacting the bottom line.

The two other books in The Leadership Mints Series -now available on Amazon.com — — include THINKING Like a Leader with Clarity and SPEAKING Like a Leader with Civility

 

 

 

All three books in The Leadership Mints Series are designed for busy leaders seeking to refresh their feeling for leading in 5-minutes or less — the average reading of a Leadership Mint.

           What ‘s a Leadership Mint?

Consumed like a breath mint — quick and on-the-go — a Leadership Mint is a short story that energizes leadership behaviors and personalizes leadership principles so they are more easily remembered, more readily acted upon and more fully applied.

 

Leadership Mints Series Sampler Rethinking SHARE Holder Value

More than 180 chief executive officers leading some of the largest companies in America last week virtually endorsed the key message in LOVING Like a Leader, the second book in the 3-book Leadership Mints Series:

A caring and sharing mindset (love in a business context) can engage all stakeholders — from employees to customers to suppliers etc —  to be more productive, more profitable and more innovative.

No way. No how. Many business owners still say it’s all about the money–accruing it, investing it and leveraging it. In fact, that money-is-everything mindset has been the prevailing opinion of business leaders for more than 20 years (since 1997).

But on August 19, 2019 — a date that will go down in the business history books and transform the way colleges teach business administration and leadership development in the future , the Business Roundtable signed and issued a Statement on the Purpose of a Corporation.

In the process this key influential corporate lobbying group comprised of chief executive officers from major corporations in America (like Amazon, Walmart) redefined  shareholder value in more than monetary terms and recanted economist Milton Friedman’s dictum in 1970 that corporations exist to maximize profits.

“Each of our stake­holders is essential. W­e commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities, and our country,” the Business Roundtable Statement says.

Now leaders in the future might consider those stakeholders — employees, customers, suppliers and the communities they live and work in — SHARE holders. They all have a share in the corporation’s bottom line success. They all must be treated equally with dignity and respect and fully factored and collaboratively considered in all decisions.

Adding a 5th “P” — PEOPLE — to the traditional 4 P’s model of business acumen and marketing know-how (Price, Production, Place, Promotion), corporate leaders in the future are more likely to see  employees as assets to be developed, nurtured and invested in not as an expense to be contained. Take it from Bob Chapman, Continue reading “Leadership Mints Series Sampler Rethinking SHARE Holder Value”

Leadership Mints Series Sample: Taking The Byte Out of Healing

Are the robots taking over the waiting rooms of medical walk-in clinics?

Sure seems that way.

Gone is the welcoming smile from the receptionist checking you in.

Gone is the warm human voice acknowledging your presence.

Gone is the human eye contact reassuring you are in caring hands.

Now you are confronted with the same glass-enclosed reception desk. However…

Instead of seeing smiles, you see the former receptionists as robots focusing on their data-entry skills.

Instead of feeling hopeful you feel helpless, stunned at the prospect of your initial healers — the receptionists — virtually burying their heads in the proverbial sand like an ostrich.

Instead of finding a  shoulder to lean on you have to settle for a cold shoulder.

And now feeling ignored at best and disrespected at least, the Walk-In’s peeve meter is skyrocketing.

Exasperated, the Walk- In looks up to the ceiling with a forlorn eyes  as if imploring some guardian angel to swoop down  and save him from this frigid foray into cyberspace.

Now. wincing at the heightened pain in his arm that initially brought him to this clinic, the Walk-In sees a sign pointing to a kiosk off to the right.The tiny-screened tablet invites the patient to SIGN IN.

Add insult to injury. Now the Walk-In  struggles to remember his or her cell phone number (since he left  the phone in his vehicle).  Then his  technical misery got worse when the machine won’t accept your sign-in without the phone number.

Frustrated, the Walk-In erupted in a verbal lashing at the technology.   The Walk-In’s outburst finally alarms the robots sitting behind the glass wall.

One of those robots — (a.ka data-input tech, formerly known as a medical receptionist) — perfunctorily tries to coach the Walk-In to sign in.

The Walk-In virtually fumbles the keyboard and finally in frustration blurts out to the robot standing next to him in front of the tablet-on-a-stick: “You do it!”

Humiliated, the Walk-In  finally sits down in the waiting room.  The robot returns to its post.

And now “freed” from “redundant” sign-in procedures, the receptionist-turned-robot can then get back to  “more value-added activities, such as patient financial counseling and marketing of preventative care services to patients,” according to one supplier of sign-in technology for medical clinics.

Highly efficient? Of course.
Highly effective? Not really.

There has to be a more constructive way to serve the bottom line.

That’s why most effective leaders seek to balance the need for both efficiency and effectiveness.

They understand cyber tools are to enhance the human experience not take a byte out the human spirit in general and healing in particular.

And the most effective leaders readily embrace the significance that new computers and tablets etc. always comes with some sort of a MAN-ual.

For more ideas on integrating a sense of humanity in deploying technology, purchase a 300-page book now available on Amazon. com filled with 77 short stories (5-minute reads called Leadership Mints) on examples from business, sports and politics.

It’s titled:          LOVING Like a Leader with Empathy– one of three books in The Leadership Mints Series designed to help leaders refresh their feeling for leading. And as a bonus, the postscript titled– BUSINESS: A HUMAN EXPERIENCE — shares the impetus for this book on empathy impacting the bottom line.

The two other books in The Leadership Mints Series -now available on Amazon.com — include THINKING Like a Leader with Clarity and SPEAKING Like a Leader with Civility