Creativity: Milking Mother Nature For Ideas

By Peter Jeff
The Leadership Mints Guy

 Here’s an idea to rev up your creative engines by taking a walk in a field. Reading time: 3:02

            Go ahead. Play hooky from the office. You owe it to your creative thought process. Still feeling guilty? Read on. Learn how three very creative leaders became outstanding in their field by literally STANDING OUT in their field.

cow leftside

Grant Wood masterpiece
Grant Wood’s “American Gothic”masterpiece

        Consider the teenager who stood out in a field and watched the harvesting of hay — row by row. He invented the television. The rows of hay gave Philo T. Farnsworth the idea of scanning and displaying a picture – row by row-on the television screen.

         A Swiss engineer also stood out in a field and subsequently invented Velcro. Georges de Mestral, using a microscope in 1941,  noticed how the hooks on the burrs and loops in the cotton fabric in his socks stuck together after he took a walk into the woods.

       Then consider the teenager, who at 14, ran a successful nail manufacturing business. One day he stood out in a field and subsequently invented the cotton gin. Eli Whitney got the idea of the claw-like machine that would pull the cotton fiber through a fence-like grid by observing a fox clawing through the chicken coop after a chicken and getting nothing but feathers.

      That field-day of the innovating proved productive and profitable. Consider the fields a place to field your fortune. After all, Grant Wood — the bucolic artist of such masterpieces at American Gothic--said he got his greatest ideas while milking cows!  Continue reading “Creativity: Milking Mother Nature For Ideas”