Smelling the ROSE of Persuasion

 By Peter Jeff
The Leadership Mints Guy

Here’s an idea to strengthen your persuasive skills. Reading time: 2:18

      Think of a ROSE the next time you’re trying to persuade someone.

      rosesROSE is an acrostic for four distinct initiatives you can use to strengthen your persuasive skills.

R   is for Reciprocal.

O   is for Opposite.

S     is for Scarcity.

E     is for Enticement.

Reciprocal

      Give something for something in return. Samples in a grocery store. Retailers conduct sales: Buy one get second one ½ price. Fast Food establishment issue BOGO coupons (buy one/get one free). Car dealers offer Continue reading “Smelling the ROSE of Persuasion”

Ask SAM: Transforming Your Train of Thought

By Peter Jeff
The Leadership Mints Guy

Here’s an idea to help you gain greater understanding of complex issues. Reading time: 2:52

           The toy train whirls around the track. Choooo. Choooo. The wisp of smoke bellows overhead. You turn the orange knob on your electric transformer. Your toy train speeds faster and faster.

         And then suddenly your nose is assaulted. A bleach-like chlorine smell pervades.The sparks flying on the track have broken down the bonds of oxygen molecules in the air. You’re now smelling ozone.

        Using an electric train’s transformer to recreate a familiar smelling experience is the way scientist Carl Sagan taught us to better understand ozone and its chemical properties in his book Billions & Billions.

        Sagan’s analogy is an example of how the most effective leaders bring abstract ideas alive – like a sense of smell—so that audiences can more fully relate and understand the concept.

       Here’s how you can be just as persuasive in bringing abstract concepts alive. Ask SAM.

      SAM is an acrostic for Simile, Analogy and Metaphor. Continue reading “Ask SAM: Transforming Your Train of Thought”

Playing Your ACE in a Stacked Deck

By Peter Jeff
The Leadership Mints Guy

Here’s an idea to help you break down inherent barriers to your ideas.

          The idea was sound. The hard-working, highly competent manager checked his facts. He had the documentation. He presented his idea clearly and concisely. No one could refute the thinking process or the expected results.

         The idea worked elsewhere. It could work here. It should work here. It will work here, he assured anyone and everyone.  Yet most of the decision-makers in the company he needed to persuade remained poker faced even though they saw that indeed the company could benefit from his idea.

        But his idea never got off the ground, even though he had done the proper research, even though he  had earned third-party endorsement from his peers outside the company.   What happened? Why didn’t his idea fly?

       Perhaps this highly competent manager forgot to EARN THE RIGHT to present a new idea beyond his credentials, expertise and education. I have been in the shoes of this highly competent manager.   I learned the hard way that when no one is buying your well researched, well thought-out idea, when the deck seemed stacked against you, the most persuasive leaders play their ACE.

       ACE–Acknowledge, Coordinate and Enhance — is a three-step persuasion process. Continue reading “Playing Your ACE in a Stacked Deck”